Three Words to Eliminate From Your CRM (and life) Today.

Summary: Language is a facilitator of action. How we use language profoundly impacts results. There are three words I see popping up in CRM systems that should be eliminated to maximize the effectiveness of your team. These words create mental traps that prevent you from reaching your potential. With that, let’s try to examine how we should improve our CRM subjects.

I spend a chunk of my week looking at CRM notes on behalf of team members and clients.  A component of No Lead Left Behind is to document everything. Like you, I receive a large number of email requests. How we use language directly impacts our effectiveness. Sometimes, words get in the way, especially when we are handing notes back and forth in a technology platform. Here are three words to eliminate from your CRM today.  

 

Yoda Called It… Trying Isn’t a thing

Do you remember Yoda?  “Do or do not, there is no try.” Other than being one of the most meme-worthy quotes in history, it is also chalk full of wisdom. When you try to lift your arm up, nothing happens, you either do or you don’t. When our CRM says, “try to contact,” contact is unlikely.

The Fix: Every time the word “try” enters into your CRM or personal life ask yourself how committed you are.  It is OK to push things out, set a low priority or admit something is a low priority.    

Stop Should’ing All Over Yourself

Should is a word that undermines commitment. You are essentially making a suggestion rather than a definitive statement which gives you room to skip out. “We should get together” is different than, “are you available Tuesday.”   

Your team gets a sense the task is not a priority. If they have something better to do, they will. You didn’t ask a person to call; you just suggested they call.  

The Fix: Replace “should” with specifics. If you don’t want to get specific, maybe it isn’t that important, and you can let it go.  

Let’s Follow Up. You, Me, All of Us!

The word “let’s” is one I find myself typing often.  For some reason, it feels better to type this when I ask for something. Unfortunately, in a fast paced environment, our brains de-prioritize requests that lack specificity.

Consider this statement: “Let’s call the client back on Tuesday.” Your team hears that someone is going to call.  Maybe you, maybe me, maybe we will hire someone new by then. Specificity drives results.  

The Fix:  Replace “let’s” with “please” or the specific name of the individual doing the work.  Everyone will thank you.  

Modifying language in a CRM system seems like small potatoes, but the road to mastery is paved with detail and discipline.  Take a week and witness your team communication.  Make an effort to clean it up.